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Law: Referencing & RefWorks

DMU Law School Referencing guide

Referencing quick guide

The instructions below are taken from the DMU Guide to Footnote Referencing (on page 12) and show you how to reference a book in your first footnote, subsequent footnote and in your bibliography.

The instructions below show you how to reference a book in your first footnote, subsequent footnote and in your bibliography according to OSCOLA.

Type Book  Notes
First footnote

Neil Parpworth, Constitutional and Administrative Law (6th edn, OUP 2010) 38. 

Trevor Buck, Richard Kirkham and Brian Thompson, The Ombudsman Enterprise and Administrative Justice (Ashgate 2011) 5. 

3  and  are the number of the footnotes (they are your 3rd and 4th footnotes). 

The number at the end of the footnote is the pinpoint  i.e. you are referring to p.38 of the book by Parpworth.

Do not mention the edition if it is a 1st edition.

Subsequent footnote Parpworth (n3) 52. In your 6th footnote, you are referring to page 52 of the book that you already referred to in footnote 3.
Bibliography

Buck T, Kirkham R and Thompson B, The Ombudsman Enterprise and Administrative Justice (Ashgate 2011). 

Parpworth N, Constitutional and Administrative Law (6th edn, OUP 2010).

 

 

The main differences between a citation in a footnote and the bibliography are: 

- the author's surname comes first followed by the initial(s) of the first name. 

- you refer to the whole book so there is no pinpoint

- the bibliography is arranged in alphabetical order by author's surname.

 

The instructions below are taken from the DMU Guide to Footnote Referencing (on page 12) and show you how to reference a journal article in your first footnote, subsequent footnotes and in your bibliography.

The instructions below show you how to reference a journal article according to OSCOLA. Reference journal articles as the paper version regardless of whether you looked at the hard (paper) or electronic database version of these items.

Type Journal article Notes
First Footnote Jo Samanta, ‘Lasting powers of attorney for healthcare under the Mental Capacity Act 2005: Enhanced prospective self-determination for future incapacity or a simulacrum?’ (2009) 17 (3) Medical Law Review 377 379. 

The name of the journal can be in full or in the preferred abbreviated form e.g. Med.L.Rev.

This article was published in volume 17, issue 3 of the Medical Law Review and begins on page 377. The information you are referring to in the footnote has been taken from pages 379 (pinpoint). 

Subsequent footnote 10 Samanta (n2) 398.  In this footnote, you are referring to p.398 of the same article (first mentioned in footnote 2).
Bibliography Samanta J, ‘Lasting powers of attorney for healthcare under the Mental Capacity Act 2005: Enhanced prospective self-determination for future incapacity or a simulacrum?’ (2009) 17 (3) Medical Law Review 377. There is no pinpoint in your bibliography, just the starting page of the article.

 

The instructions below are taken from the DMU Guide to Footnote Referencing (on page 11) and show you how to reference a case in your first footnote and subsequent footnotes. Cases are not included in your bibliography.

 

Type Case without neutral citation (before 2001) Notes
In the text example It is well represented in the case law, perhaps most notably in the expression of the no-conflict rule advocated by Lord Upjohn in Phipps v Boardman1  (…)  In Phipps, Lord Upjohn developed his view of the rule further by adding that there must be a ‘real sensible possibility of conflict’.6 The first time you mention a case in your text give the party names in italics
First footnote 1 [1967] 2 AC 46 (HL). If you have mentioned the parties' name in your text, you do not need to mention them again in your footnote
Subsequent footnote Phipps (n1) 124

You can mention the case by a shorten version of the case name in subsequent citation. 

Here you are referring to page 124 of the case report.

Type Case with a neutral citation (2001 onwards) Notes
In the text example In Corr v IBC Vehicles Ltd, Lord Bingham stated that "The rationale of the principle that a novus actus interveniens breaks the chain of causation is fairness." 3 The first time you mention a case in your text give the party names
First footnote 3 [2008] UKHL 13, [2008] 1 AC 884  The law report citation is preceded by the neutral citation

The instructions below are taken from the DMU Guide to Footnote Referencing (on page 11) and show you how to reference Legislation in your first footnote and subsequent footnotes. Legislation is not included in your bibliography.

Type UK legislation Notes
In the text example This case highlights the far-reaching judicial role ushered in by the Human Rights Act (HRA) 1998. British courts must only consider Strasbourg jurisprudence: they are not bound by it. If you are referring to the same Act more than once, include its abbreviated form in the text in brackets after the title the first time you mention it in the text. You can then refer to it again by using only the abbreviated form followed by the year.
First footnote

Human Rights Act (HRA) 1998, s 2. 

A citation in a footnote is not required if all the information the reader needs about the source is provided in the text, but it is where you have not named the Act in the text, or where you need to refer to a specific section (as in  'In the text example')
Subsequent footnotes

HRA 1998, sX. (Note - where X is the specific section referred to). 

You can write the name of the Act in abbreviated form followed by the year  in subsequent footnotes.

 

The instructions below are taken from the DMU Guide to Footnote Referencing (on page 13) and show you how to reference a website in your first footnote, subsequent footnotes and in your bibliography.

From Cardiff University, this A-Z Examples list includes many more examples of primary and secondary sources and how to reference them using OSCOLA. It also includes more general guidance on grammar and bibliographies.

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Referencing tutorial

Practice your legal referencing skills with this tutorial from Cardiff University.  

  

Good academic practice

See the main  'Referencing guide' for an introduction to referencing, plagiarism and good academic practice. 

RefWorks

RefWorks is a software designed to allow you to input, organise, manage, retrieve and format lists of references (bibliographies).

Other law referencing guides

The DMU Law School referencing guide is based on OSCOLA: the Oxford Standard for Citation of Legal Authorities. Below are the more detailed OSCOLA guides on which the style is based.